Teaching and Learning

Photo of Peter Yu '83 and his parents, Charles and Marie

Honoring the Past While Helping to Shape the Future

June 14th, 2017 / Development Com...

When Charles Yu was a young boy in the 1930s, China was in turmoil. The central government was fighting internal revolutionary forces, poverty and crime were rampant, and imperialist Japanese forces had gained control of the northeastern provinces. Troops were steadily moving south toward Charles’s village when his family fled to Manila.  

China global seminar

China Up Close: A Global Seminar Immerses Students in a Changing Society

December 19th, 2016 / Development Com...

During a sunrise run in China’s remote Gansu Province last summer, Sam Rasmussen ’19 felt he was traveling back in time to China as it looked decades ago. He jogged on unpaved roads through desert terrain, past homes made of adobe and farmers working in their fields. When he needed a pit stop, a farmer led Rasmussen behind his house to a concrete slab over two holes in the ground.

Students in Computer Science class

Computing Solutions to Society's Challenges

December 8th, 2016 / Development Com...

Computer science powers the work of many disciplines. If a molecular biologist needs to match up millions of pairs of genes, or a humanist wants to mine databases to understand the evolution of English prose, computers make it possible. Princeton’s computer science department, part of the University’s renowned engineering school, is distinguished by its deep expertise in both the theoretical foundations of computing and the many applications of computing in modern life.

Mpala Research Centre

Wild Science: The Nature of the Mpala Research Centre

October 25th, 2016 / University Comm...

NANYUKI, Kenya — Princeton University graduate student Tyler Coverdale and Ryan O'Connell of the Class of 2017 clap as they walk around the tall bushes surrounding the sprawling experiment site. Not in applause, or for self-motivation — but to alert any buffalo, elephants or other animals that might be foraging for food or seeking shade from the intense equatorial sun. This is the nature of working at the Mpala Research Centre, a multidisciplinary and multi-institutional field laboratory that sits on a 50,000-acre reserve and ranch in Laikipia County in central Kenya.

Transformations

Transformations: Students Find Creativity at Intersection of Art and Engineering

July 18th, 2016 / University Comm...

Inspired by the desire to help broaden boundaries for vision-impaired people, three Princeton University students created an armband device that allows a wearer without the ability to see to interpret color. The project emerged from a new class offered for the first time this spring, "Transformations in Engineering and the Arts," and lived up to the name of the course.

CITP bootcamp students meet with Microsoft

Technology's Impact on Our Lives

June 27th, 2016 / Development Com...

Digital technology has become essential for personal communication, getting the news, banking, shopping, and countless routine transactions. As our reliance on technological devices grows, however, pressing questions emerge: How do we define privacy online? Who has access to our data—and how will they use it? How do we prevent cyber attacks?

Professor Ted Taylor

From Butterflies to Tomorrow’s Chemists: Professor Emeritus Ted Taylor Helps Discovery Take Flight

April 22nd, 2016 / Development Com...

In his four decades on the Princeton faculty, Ted Taylor earned the admiration of his students and colleagues for his cheerful nature and commitment to rigorous research. Even in retirement, he has continued to support and shape new generations of scientists by establishing the Edward and Virginia Taylor Professorship in Bioorganic Chemistry and the Edward C. Taylor Fellowships for third-year graduate students in chemistry. The fellowships allow Princeton to fund students for three years—a rarity in higher education—freeing them from the need to tie their research interests to grant support.

Computing the Human Experience

March 17th, 2016 / Development Com...

Humanists traditionally have spent long hours in archives poring through books, letters, and ephemera, laboriously piecing together information. Today, digital technology has streamlined and galvanized this process. Now scholars can not only quickly access and preserve different kinds of information but also identify connections among their discoveries, creating new data for scholars around the world.

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