News Archive

LEDA student

LEDA Summer at Princeton Guides High School Students on Path for Success

In a wood-paneled room in Princeton University's historic East Pyne building, 15 students sit among a circle of desks debating a question: Who was a more effective leader, Martin Luther King Jr. or Malcolm X?

"In terms of effectiveness, I'd say one is not better than the other because they both served the purpose of a practical movement," said Bessie Bauman of Olathe, Kansas.

Stephen Condit

How Friendship Helped Launch a Department

In 1983 the University was notified that Stephen Hobart Condit of Parsippany-Troy Hills had left some 50 acres of New Jersey real estate, including his historic home, in an unrestricted bequest to Princeton. Condit, a Lehigh University graduate, had contributed to Annual Giving in years past in memory of two alumni he believed were related to him, Professor Kenneth H. Condit '1913, who served as the dean of the School of Engineering during World War II, and Benjamin Smith Condit '1880. But this gift--which eventually amounted to more than $1 million when the property was sold--seemed out of the blue.

Starn Sculpture

Sculptors Create Grand Entrance to Art Museum

Before visitors step inside Princeton’s world-class art museum, they are greeted by a monumental glass and steel sculpture, a creative bridge from the campus’s arboretum-like setting to the visual treasures inside. Noted artists Doug and Mike Starn, twin brothers whose work has been exhibited at New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Macro Museum in Rome, and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, among other public and private collections, designed (Any) Body Oddly Propped especially for the museum’s front lawn. The commissioned work features eighteen-foot-tall panels of color made in a new glass-dyeing technique pioneered in Germany.

The contemporary landmark was made possible in part by the generosity of painter and conservationist Shelly Belfer Malkin ’86 and Anthony E. Malkin.

PhD Graduates

An Intellectual Infusion

For more than 100 years Princeton’s Graduate School has attracted the world’s most promising young scholars. They work in labs, in libraries, in the field, and in classrooms, infusing the campus with fresh ideas and helping to drive discovery. These graduate students collaborate with the University’s faculty members, produce original scholarship, and teach and mentor undergraduates, in preparation for leadership roles in academia, industry, and government.

Transformations

Transformations: Students Find Creativity at Intersection of Art and Engineering

Inspired by the desire to help broaden boundaries for vision-impaired people, three Princeton University students created an armband device that allows a wearer without the ability to see to interpret color. The project emerged from a new class offered for the first time this spring, "Transformations in Engineering and the Arts," and lived up to the name of the course.

Pages