Impact Stories

President Eisgruber at FSI

The Freshman Scholars Institute Helps Students Start Strong

October 12th, 2016 / Development Com...

When Laura Peña ’19 arrived at Princeton, she thought everyone was “a genius who had it all together.” Despite her stellar high school grades, she felt like an impostor and worried that maybe she didn’t really belong at the University. “If you’re from a background like mine, lower income and first generation, sometimes you wonder, ‘Am I a statistic or am I here because someone sees something in me?’” said Peña, who is from Elizabeth, New Jersey.

Stage light

Music Theater Program Combines Collaboration and Creativity

October 4th, 2016 / University Comm...

A needle peeks through the thick fabric as trim is sewn onto a costume. A tap shoe clicks its energetic, syncopated rhythm on the stage floor. A soprano's voice wends its way through the air with heartbreaking melody. Bodies leap and bound, then gently connect and dissipate. And anyone in the rehearsal room can ask, "What if? …"

Deirdre Ricaurte '16

An Internship in the Complexities of Caring

September 8th, 2016 / Development Com...

Shortly after arriving in La Paz, Bolivia, Deirdre Ricuarte ’16 found herself in a pediatric oncology department. She and her fellow interns were charged with talking to the patients and their parents to learn about their conditions and treatments. Most of the children were too tired to interact. But one five-year-old boy, Christian, craved her attention.

LEDA student

LEDA Summer at Princeton Guides High School Students on Path for Success

August 24th, 2016 / University Comm...

In a wood-paneled room in Princeton University's historic East Pyne building, 15 students sit among a circle of desks debating a question: Who was a more effective leader, Martin Luther King Jr. or Malcolm X?

"In terms of effectiveness, I'd say one is not better than the other because they both served the purpose of a practical movement," said Bessie Bauman of Olathe, Kansas.

Winthrop Short ’41, Winthrop Short ’68, Amanda Linhart ’97

Five Decades of Leading the Pack

August 12th, 2016 / Development Com...

It was the final day of the 1965–66 Annual Giving campaign and Winthrop Short ’41 was on the phone with Princeton to see where his class stood. As the leader of the Class of 1941’s effort heading into its 25th Reunion, Short was trying to rally his classmates to a new all-time high for any Princeton class—$200,000.

Stephen Condit

How Friendship Helped Launch a Department

August 9th, 2016 / Gift Planning

In 1983 the University was notified that Stephen Hobart Condit of Parsippany-Troy Hills had left some 50 acres of New Jersey real estate, including his historic home, in an unrestricted bequest to Princeton. Condit, a Lehigh University graduate, had contributed to Annual Giving in years past in memory of two alumni he believed were related to him, Professor Kenneth H. Condit '1913, who served as the dean of the School of Engineering during World War II, and Benjamin Smith Condit '1880. But this gift--which eventually amounted to more than $1 million when the property was sold--seemed out of the blue.

Starn Sculpture

Sculptors Create Grand Entrance to Art Museum

August 2nd, 2016 / Development Com...

Before visitors step inside Princeton’s world-class art museum, they are greeted by a monumental glass and steel sculpture, a creative bridge from the campus’s arboretum-like setting to the visual treasures inside. Noted artists Doug and Mike Starn, twin brothers whose work has been exhibited at New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Macro Museum in Rome, and the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, among other public and private collections, designed (Any) Body Oddly Propped especially for the museum’s front lawn. The commissioned work features eighteen-foot-tall panels of color made in a new glass-dyeing technique pioneered in Germany.

The contemporary landmark was made possible in part by the generosity of painter and conservationist Shelly Belfer Malkin ’86 and Anthony E. Malkin.

PhD Graduates

An Intellectual Infusion

July 20th, 2016 / Development Com...

For more than 100 years Princeton’s Graduate School has attracted the world’s most promising young scholars. They work in labs, in libraries, in the field, and in classrooms, infusing the campus with fresh ideas and helping to drive discovery. These graduate students collaborate with the University’s faculty members, produce original scholarship, and teach and mentor undergraduates, in preparation for leadership roles in academia, industry, and government.

Alan ’46 and Susan Lukens

With the Heart of a Tiger: From the Battlefield to the Diplomatic Corps

July 20th, 2016 / Development Com...

Alan Lukens ’46’s college years were interrupted by World War II. Part of the US Army’s 20th Armored Division, he was 21 years old in April 1945 when his unit and other American soldiers broke through barbed wire surrounding Germany’s Dachau concentration camp to find emaciated prisoners shouting in relief.

Transformations

Transformations: Students Find Creativity at Intersection of Art and Engineering

July 18th, 2016 / University Comm...

Inspired by the desire to help broaden boundaries for vision-impaired people, three Princeton University students created an armband device that allows a wearer without the ability to see to interpret color. The project emerged from a new class offered for the first time this spring, "Transformations in Engineering and the Arts," and lived up to the name of the course.

streets

Six Weeks in Ghana: Linking the Past to the Present

June 30th, 2016 / Development Com...

Simon Gikandi, Princeton's Robert Schirmer Professor of English, wanted students to experience Africa up close: "not from outside, but from inside." He took them to places where they could wander through the streets, talk to residents, and question their own assumptions. In Gikandi's six-week global seminar, "African Cities: Their Pasts and Futures," students read about African cities from different perspectives—literary, sociological, historical—studied Twi, the local language, and immersed themselves in the sites and sounds of Accra.

CITP bootcamp students meet with Microsoft

Technology's Impact on Our Lives

June 27th, 2016 / Development Com...

Digital technology has become essential for personal communication, getting the news, banking, shopping, and countless routine transactions. As our reliance on technological devices grows, however, pressing questions emerge: How do we define privacy online? Who has access to our data—and how will they use it? How do we prevent cyber attacks?

Kimberly K. Querrey and Louis A. Simpson

$20 Million Gift from an Alumnus Funds the Louis A. Simpson International Building at Princeton

June 7th, 2016 / Development Com...

Louis A. Simpson, a 1960 alumnus of Princeton’s Graduate School, and his wife, Kimberly K. Querrey, have given $20 million to fund the Louis A. Simpson *60 International Building. The building, expected to be completed this summer, will be the home of the University’s many international initiatives.

Faculty

From Algorithms to Animal Herds, Endowed Chairs Power Scholarship

May 23rd, 2016 / Gift Planning

Robert Sedgewick introduces students to the power and potential of computing. Simon Gikandi reexamines the influence that the historical interchange between Europe and Africa had on language and culture. Naomi Ehrich Leonard ’85 designs dynamics for robots inspired by the collective motion found in nature, from flocks of birds to schools of fish.

Stephen Condit and James Merrill Macfarland ’32

The Case of the Mystery Bequest

May 23rd, 2016 / Gift Planning

In 1983 the University was notified that Stephen Hobart Condit of Parsippany-Troy Hills had left some 50 acres of New Jersey real estate in an unrestricted bequest to Princeton. Condit, a Lehigh University graduate, had contributed to Annual Giving in years past in memory of two alumni he believed were related to him. But this gift—which eventually amounted to more than $1 million when the property was sold—seemed out of the blue. Then came a letter from Condit’s lifelong friend James Merrill Macfarland ’32

Juggling

A New Way to Juggle It All

May 23rd, 2016 / Gift Planning

Looking for better returns and security in a volatile market? Want to help future Princetonians? Princeton now offers deferred charitable gift annuities and has lowered its age minimums. These lifetime fixed payments are backed by the full faith and credit of the University.

Professor Ted Taylor

From Butterflies to Tomorrow’s Chemists: Professor Emeritus Ted Taylor Helps Discovery Take Flight

April 22nd, 2016 / Development Com...

In his four decades on the Princeton faculty, Ted Taylor earned the admiration of his students and colleagues for his cheerful nature and commitment to rigorous research. Even in retirement, he has continued to support and shape new generations of scientists by establishing the Edward and Virginia Taylor Professorship in Bioorganic Chemistry and the Edward C. Taylor Fellowships for third-year graduate students in chemistry. The fellowships allow Princeton to fund students for three years—a rarity in higher education—freeing them from the need to tie their research interests to grant support.

Louis Bacon's Moore Charitable Foundation establishes Science-to-Action Fund at Princeton

March 28th, 2016 / Development Com...

In a unique effort to combine the expertise of university scientists and conservation organizations, Louis Bacon’s Moore Charitable Foundation has pledged $1.25 million to establish the Science-to-Action Fund at Princeton University. The fund will support environmental research that advances scientific understanding and practical, on-the-ground solutions in order to ensure the sustainable and rational use of freshwater for all.

Computing the Human Experience

March 17th, 2016 / Development Com...

Humanists traditionally have spent long hours in archives poring through books, letters, and ephemera, laboriously piecing together information. Today, digital technology has streamlined and galvanized this process. Now scholars can not only quickly access and preserve different kinds of information but also identify connections among their discoveries, creating new data for scholars around the world.

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